Further Suggestions for Your Practice

This routine is based on a daily, private Yoga practice that Paul Keoni Chun has used outside of the studio, specifically in a home setting.   It has been tailored for people who are already in a regular ongoing Yoga practice with a teacher, not for true Beginners. 

However, it can be used successfully by people who are at the end of the Beginning stage, as well as people who are Intermediate or even Advanced Yoga practitioners. 

The practice includes some of the essential postures found in a regular Yoga class, and is intended to be brief enough so that you can do a little bit of Yoga every day.

How to Get Started
How to Listen
When to Use This Practice
Props You Will Need
The Room Environment
Tips for Practicing Outdoors
Your Body
Modifications
Advice for Women
Further Guidance


How to Get Started

Listening to the Introduction once will get you started.   It contains much of the same information you find in this section of the website. 

Then, after you've gotten yourself set up, dressed, and positioned on your Yoga mat, practice first to the extended 35 minute version.   It is the same routine as the 25 minute version yet slower and more detailed in its description.  

If you are Intermediate or Advanced, you may wish to move on from here to using the 25 minute version as your regular routine.  However, you may prefer  a slower pace for your practice, or taking it slower from time to time as a change of pace will feel right.  In these cases, the 35 minute version will be a better fit. 

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How to Listen

If listening through headphones, make sure they are comfortably fitted and securely connected to a small audio/MP3 player worn on your belt or arm.  Be sure that you have enough flexibility to move your arms freely without getting tangled, and that during inversions such as Downward Dog, the excess cord won't droop too much so as to cause distraction.  Experiment until you find the right set up for you.   This arrangement will give you the most flexibility and privacy, allowing you to practice anywhere, anytime. 

You may also decide to listen through your stereo or computer speakers.  

We recommend becoming deeply familiar with this practice before adding music.   Some people enjoy playing their own music simultaneously at a very low level, but only after becoming thoroughly versed in the specifics of the verbal cues.   Music may distract the ear and make following the audio prompts more difficult.   

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When to Use This Practice

This flow is a more invigorating type of practice, ideally used in the morning or at a time when you need a pick-me-up, such as in the middle of your afternoon.   It has been designed as a daily private practice to supplement a regular class schedule, as an occasional replacement for a missed class, or as a portable private practice when traveling. 

General guidelines recommend that you not eat two hours prior to practicing. However, if you are extremely hungry, eating a piece of fruit before practicing should, in most cases, be fine.

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Props You Will Need

You will need a sticky Yoga mat, and if you are indoors, it’s best to place the Yoga mat on a firm surface.  Carpeting will also work, if that's the only surface available.

No blocks or straps are required for this particular routine.  

Some enjoy using a folded blanket to sit on, and then, for Savasana, unfolding it and spreading it over their body for added warmth. 

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The Room Environment

Ideally Yoga is practiced in a warm environment, 80 degress Fahrenheit or 27 degrees Celsius.  In the winter, you may need to turn on your heat.   In smaller apartments, a helpful tip is to put a pot of water on the stove and boil it, bringing some humidity and warmth to the room.  

Practice with enough clothing on to keep you warm, and be sure that they are loose-fitting enough, allowing you to move freely. 

Make sure that you have enough space around when you’re practicing.   Stand in the middle of your Yoga mat and reach your arms sideways, upward, forward and back, to give you a sense of the amount of space you need to practice safely and comfortably in. 

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Tips for Practicing Outdoors

Practicing outdoors - perhaps at a park or the beach - can be refreshing! If you happen to be at a grassy park, try to place your yoga mat on grass that is pretty low cut. If you are enjoying practicing on the beach, make sure the mat is placed on sand that is firmer rather than softer. This will permit you to get a more firm grip with your hands and feet and therefore, more solidity in your stances.

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Your Body

If you have any physical concerns, you should consult with your physician first, to make sure that you’re not going to injure yourself in some of the physical work you’ll be doing in this practice. 

As you practice Yoga, never strain.   Yoga may feel uncomfortable at times, but it should never hurt.   If you find that you’re not able to breathe smoothly, or muscles or joints are starting to strain or feel very uncomfortable, it's best to back off, modify, and take things easier. 

When you practice on a daily basis, your body’s going to feel different each day. What you were able to do yesterday, you might not be able to do today.  

Please listen to your body on a daily basis, and listen for exactly what your body is telling you that it needs in those moments.

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What are modifications, and can you recommend some I can do?

Modifications are any alternative postures you decide to perform instead of, or in addition to, the suggested poses in the audio. You may choose to modify in order to decrease or increase the difficulty level and/or intensity of the practice, according to your needs.   

Some modifications are taken because of physical concerns, such as painful joints (knees, ankles, wrists), injuries to any part of your body, fatigue, or flexibility limitations (everyone’s different!). Other modifications are taken because the practitioner desires to build extra strength, or is already familiar with the basic pose and wishes to engage in a more advanced form of it, or simply craves variety.   

Some common modifications for the poses you'll encounter in this practice are:

Instead of:  Modification:
Downward Dog Child's Pose
Chatturanga Place knees down, then slowly lower stomach and chest
Upward Dog     Cobra
Cobra Upward Dog
Warrior One Use same foot positions, but shorten the stance to make it easier and more stable
Warrior Two Use same foot positions, but shorten the stance to make it easier and more stable
Reverse Warrior Use same foot positions, but straighten the front knee until you feel stable 
Stick Pose If the backs of your legs are stiff and it's hard to sit up straight, either bend the knees slightly or place a blanket or cushion under your seat
Forward Bend If the back of your legs are stiff and it's hard to fold your torso forward, either bend the knees slightly or place a blanket or cushion under your seat; separating your feet hip-distance apart will also help
Seated Twist  If it's hard to sit up straight, it is because the foot of the leg that is pointing to sky is too close to your seat; step that foot farther away, perhaps just inside the shin bone
Shoulder Stand    Take your legs up the wall

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Advice for Women

If you happen to be in your Moon Cycle when practicing, you might not want to invert into Shoulder Stand.  Modification options included resting in Child’s Pose, or lying down on your back in Supta Baddha Konasana (also known as supine or "sleeping"  bound angle posture), or taking your legs up a wall. 

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Further Guidance

Should you need further guidance with any of the poses, it’s best if you consult with your teacher, who can give you a hands on demonstration of what the poses should look like, and can also assist you in offering modifications that will work best for your body. 

Also, you’re welcome to contact us and we’ll be very happy to assist you in any way that we can. 

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